Saturday, April 1, 2017

Question for the Community: Family Camp Names

New Hampshire Photographs from SWNE Archives
Question for the Community:
My parents have a family camp that we call "The Mill" because my father built a log cabin and had a cider mill for about 10 years (before restricting laws forced him to either update or shut down...he shut down). This past summer, my parents gifted us each a piece of the old farm and my children and I are building a new family camp on our piece. We have been within an hour of this land for eleven generations and believe we are building something for future generations. The problem becomes what to call our place located on Blackberry Street. I was hoping that your readers would have some inspiration for us, and I would love to read their house names as well. I find names and histories fascinating.

24 comments:

  1. A dozen years ago, I added on a couple rooms to an old hunter's cabin in the woods. I moved up there with my cat and two dogs. I called the place Nimblecat because my cat had such fun playing and jumping across the exposed ceiling joists. It was my all-alone-in-the-woods dream cabin. Just mine, to live as I pleased.

    Ten years later, my life had completely changed. My original cat & dog had died; I'd gotten married and had a child; and we began turning the place into a proper woodland family home. The spring we were married, a pair of wrens built a nest and raised their chicks in the windowbox just outside the kitchen. Everything was so very, very different now; it needed a new name to signify the change. We call it Wrenwood.

    As for choosing a name, I like to make lists and combine. Column of nouns you associate with your home/camp. Column of adjectives. Column of locations (hill, meadow, ridge, fell, etc.) Mix and match until you find a few that feel right & sound good. Then take that handful and choose the one.

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  2. I love Marisa's idea about incorporating a descriptor of the land, but your street name could give rise to lots of nice ideas too. My family could not come to any sort of agreement, so we finally settled for keeping the name of an old camp that once stood here and we found the former owner to make sure it was okay. My favorite local names are made-up Indian words. Just down the road is a cabin owned by Pug owners who call their place Camp Walkadoggie.

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  3. Our camp/cottage/cabin is located in an area with names that make no sense.

    For example, there are the false American Indian names that have no connection to the geographical area/tribes and the camps named for locations of the owner's that are also false as in Boston Camp for a three generation family from Hartford.

    The balance seem to have cute names such as Hearts Desire, No Worries, Serendipity, The Shack, etc.

    We bought a 100+ year old camp that wasn't named. (The prior owner bucked the norm.) This bothered the community greatly and we were pestered for years to come up with a name. We choose a name based upon a certain insect that is in abundance during the springtime.

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  4. Although a child of yankees, I grew up in the deep south and still live here. I have a place on an old mill pond in rural Mississippi where each of the parcels sharing a lake are named for some flora or fauna found on the property. My place is Pinelilly, a native wildflower to coastal Mississippi.

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  5. We live on an old, old river in the deep south. Our dogs are not different from our children.
    We named our place WAGMORE.

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  6. When flood waters destroyed my neighbors 100 year old cabin they rebuilt around the fireplace using same original boards they could restore. When time came to retire they named the new house after long last "SOMEDAY CAME".

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  7. Being your family has lived in this area for 11 generations; possibly utilize an historical event for part of the name. Although my favorite suggestion would be to use a vintage name derived from your family's genealogy. Either way, something that would be an educational tool for future discussions around campfires. Marisa's last paragraph offers some good advise.

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  8. Our house was unnamed when we got it. Had been built and lived in by successive generations of one family for 170+ years. We named it after them.

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  9. We have always called the family camp " The Farm" mainly because it is built on an old cotton farm.

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  10. Ours is "Old Vinylsides". Family joke.

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  11. We described our comings and goings to our cottage by stating we were going "Up North" - to New Hampshire in our case. After years of going "there", it became the official house name, with a sign.

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  12. We named our home after the town in Tasmania we met in ( in a coffee shop where we shared the last of an apple cake we both liked : how's that for a romantic start ! ) nearly forty years ago : Rosevears .

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    1. I solidly support that naming method!

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  13. My wife's grandfather built a cabin on a small lake. It has been called "The Cabin." Simple and effective.

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    1. Ours, too, was simply called 'The Cabin'.

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    2. That's what my family has done for our shore home. It's just lovingly called "The House" and when the cedar shake or an appliance needs to be replaced "That Damn House"

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  14. Congratulations regarding your gift! What about "Blackberry on the Mill" or some other variation thereof. This would give a nod to both the past and the future.
    Our home is named "Autumn Cottage" due to the area forest, our homes colors and being our abode in the "Autumn" of our lives. Enjoy!

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  15. The cottage. Simple & sweet. cheers!

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  16. My camp is called #Resistance

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  17. Perhaps too whimsical but I have always dreamed of calling my "forever home", exactly that... "Forever Home". My family have a Danish summerhouse on the coast of Falster that we call "Hygge" (before the word became fashionable).

    If I were to pick a name for yours I would choose "Ol' Scrumpy" - in homage to the Cider Mill. "Let's go to visit Ol' Scrumpy this weekend" sounds like a family in-joke. You wouldn't know what it is if you weren't on the inside! Is it a dog? An old curmudgeon?

    "We're staying at Scrumps".

    There's nothing better than speaking in code and keeping the best kept secrets just that.

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  18. Love your logic, Alena! You have painted an alluring naming picture.

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  19. I'm thinking that Cabin on Blackberry fits nicely.

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