Monday, May 1, 2017

With thanks to the farmer who dropped off this raw milk...

Added bonus: organic farm dirt.

7 comments:

  1. My brother developed an allergy to cow's milk as a young child. So he would have milk, we started raising dairy goats. ( French Alpine, great temperament, we kept one as a pet after he outgrew the allergy)
    There is nothing like fresh raw milk. Not only was it a wonderful source of product, it also taught us the responsibility as youth of feeding, milking, generally taking care of not only the animal, but also the equipment, building in the process.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Pasteurized/homogenized milk removes all that is beneficial to health and well being. There is nothing like raw milk, especially raw goal milk which is even more digestible. (The same is true about raw vinegar versus the pasteurized version.)

    ReplyDelete
  3. One of the few times I wrote to my state legislator was to urge her to support the continued (legal) sale of raw milk. This was several years back, there had been an incident and a motion to ban sale. The popularity/venues were not as widespread as it is now and fortunately, and it's available to this day. In my letter, I likened sale of raw mik to sale of sashimi - with the right quality controls, let the consumer choose. Choose they have - saw raw milk ice cream the other day at the health food store.

    ReplyDelete
  4. There are many different ways to treat raw milk to be safe without "killing" the benefits- but killing the bacteria present in it. Once you get ill from what is in raw milk, you will certainly understand what is worth consuming, and treatment of illness. Research for yourself, education is a good thing.
    Signed the Dairy Farmers daughter.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The best cheese (and butter) comes only from unpasteurized milk. That is why the cheese in France, Switzerland or Austria tastes better.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Raw milk in Connecticut is by definition some of the "cleanest" you can get; all raw milk dairies, however large or small, must be certified several times per year by rigorous testing for bacteria by a State lab and the facility itself inspected. I have heard all about this process from the farmers from whom I buy mine. The milk must pass FAR more rigorous standards (basically be bacteria-free) in order to be sold raw. The stuff bound for pasteurization, on the other hand, can contain stuff you LITERALLY don't want to know about. If your stomach is strong, go to westonaprice.org and click on "Real Milk." You'll accept no substitutes once you read THAT! BTW, calcium is a FAT-SOLUBLE mineral so it needs the full-fat content of real milk to be absorbed by your body. "No-fat, low-fat and skim" milks are worthless products as everything of any value has been removed from them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for the Weston A. Price Foundation site...good resource!

      Delete