Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Richard Milhous Nixon

Original Photograph from Archives

24 comments:

  1. Was this posted for topical reasons?

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  2. I certainly didn't see that coming.

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  3. Don't they look crisp and natty and fit in their suits. And not one hideous, extra-long, crotch-skimming red tie among them. Let us all now lament the passing of the era of the casually-elegant political male.

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    1. The looks on their faces...

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    2. No skin showing between the socks and the trousers, but what's with the crossed arm body posture?

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    3. Nobody touching anyone! That's what it means.

      In a black & white photo, you can't tell what color tie they're wearing. But Nixon was known for tucking the end of his tie into his trousers.

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    4. Body language: Folding arms - creates a sense of being closed off or disinterested in others. While RMN looks casually loose with his arms, what do you think the other two are "saying"?

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    5. The era of well-dressed politicians isn't over, it's just that the torch has been passed to a new generation of...foreigners. As examples, the classic American prep look has been co-opted by Prime Ministers Emmanuel Macron of France, Justin Trudeau of Canada and Enrique Pena Nieto of Mexico.

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  4. Muffy, you have a great sense of humor!

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  5. I saw him in a NYC hospital elevator in the early 1980s. He was alone but wore a campaign smile.

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  6. Remembering the lessons from the past...one can hope.

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  7. Suit sans bouffant.

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  8. If I am not mistaken, this pic shows three different collars on their white shirts. From L to R: possibly a button down, Nixon, spread collar, far right: tab collar. I remember the thin ties and the narrower lapels. This shows how everything was proportional. However, I think I prefer what we see most today, slightly wider ties and lapels on suits. I also remember when the fashions back then started to change and there was too much of clash of styles that along with the Vietnam War and the dramatic changes to societal norms, created a dizzying hodgepodge mess.

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    1. Oh, styles are always changing. You can't stop it. My boss was still wearing tab collars when I began working here 18 years ago and tomorrow is his last day.

      I still wear relatively narrow ties. The one I'm wearing now is 3 3/8th wide at the bottom, although I know ties used to be narrower and plainer in the early 60s. I find ties to be really difficult to tie and make look good but I still wear them. I prefer wool over other materials because I think they're a little easier to tie.

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    2. The tie on the far right is not a tab collar although the appearance is virtually the same as a tab collar; in fact, the gentleman is wearing a long-point collar with a collar bar

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  9. @jvk - "No skin showing between the socks and the trousers" sock garters! Just found an old (really old, like 1950s ;)) pair of my dad's and my husband had NO idea what they were - despite the fact that I'm sure my father-in-law sported them as well, at one time or another.

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  10. By the by, who might the gentlemen on either side of RMN be?

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  11. One of the greatest.

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    1. One of the greatest what...?

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    2. Presidents and statesmen.

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    3. Nixon's Presidency was not without its accomplishments. These include the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency, the opening of diplomatic relations between the USA and mainland China, and arms reduction treaties with the Soviets. He advocated for universal health care in the USA. Nixon's failings are well-known, the most serious being the prolonging of the Vietnam War, but I believe much of the contempt directed at Nixon was not due to his policies, but simply because he was socially awkward, especially when compared to his political foes who had family money and connections, burnished with Ivy League polish. In the end, Nixon was his own worst enemy. But compared with the shenanigans in the last election carried out by all sides, with its leaked e-mails and stolen private conversations, in retrospect, the slapstick Watergate burglary and cover-up that brought down Nixon seems like much ado about nothing.

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  12. New York Post headline on April 23, 1994;
    Nixon Loses Final Battle

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  13. A picture says a thousand words!

    --EM

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