Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Question for the Community: Snacks?

Sugar Snap Peas
Two Questions for the Community:
  • What would your perfect afternoon snack be?
  • What is your most common afternoon snack?

Oatmeal, Whole Wheat and Chocolate Chips


Lobster Roll on the Go

Yogurt, Honey, Blueberries and Walnuts

The Corporate Default?

53 comments:

  1. I really do need that afternoon snack around 4:00 or so! I need something to pick me up that is NOT sugar and/or caffeine. Lately it has been the absolutely wonderful Siggi's strained whole milk vanilla yogurt (4% milkfat) with a sprinkling of cinnamon and 6 toasted pecans broken up into the 4.4 oz. cup. I might also have a small apple or some berries. This is the snack that will work to make me most functional until dinner, but to be honest, I would really love to have a "slab" of banana or pumpkin bread spread with mascarpone and a mug of Harney & Sons Darjeeling tea. Unfortunately, that delightful snack doesn't carry me very far.

    Jacqueline

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  2. when peckishness strikes, hummus and pita chips.

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  3. A handful of shelled peanuts or a piece of cheese, usually. Like your photo, when sugar snap peas are in season I devour them between meals. When my tomatoes are ripe in the summer I'll eat them like candy.

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  4. Perfect snack would be too embarrassingly fattening and unhealthy to reveal.

    Most common is fruit, every day around 4pm.

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    1. Let us all ponder the various social statements being expressed by the oh-so-fashionable Food Snobbery.

      In The Real World, lots of people actually eat things that taste good, fill them up, and leave them satisfied. Of course, they generally like to eat; as opposed to those who like to virtue-signal by tiresomely telling all and sundry what they're NOT eating.

      I find the like-to-eat crowd far more genuine and refreshing than the health-nannies and bores who think the universe gives "points" for anorexic ideation.

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    2. @ Greenfield: While I basically agree with your exhaustion concerning present day food snobbery and all the mixed messages it sends, i.e., no bread, no meat, no dairy etc., there are good reasons why people choose their foods wisely other than "anorexic ideation". While I tend to have a voracious appetite and love mostly all foods, I am also a two-time cancer survivor and for the reason of maintaining a healthy immune system, I learned to read labels and to control the "junk" I put into my body by way of chemical additives and preservatives not to mention the over consumption of sugar that is causing more health problems than you can name. (One has to keep in mind that the commercial growing methods and processes of foodstuff has changed drastically over the years in that the foods we used to eat may no longer be the best options.) That said, there is no reason to compromise taste and satisfaction by choosing foods whose calories have been artificially reduced and therefore, taste compromised. In fact, the wave of no-fat, low-fat diets has done more damage than good - the body needs "good" fats in order to function properly. I say, everything in balance but choose wisely.

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    3. Well said, JVK.

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    4. @greenfield - is this somehow directed at me? Virtue-signal? Health nanny? I'm a bore and and tiresome? Anorexic ideation - I don't even know what that means......Did I just happen to be caught in your judgement net?

      @jvk - exactly!

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    5. In the real world, people also eat rubbish that makes them logy and overweight, and shortens their lives. Norther Americans are fatter than they ever have been, in no small part because of what they eat, when they eat it, how they eat it, and how they don't burn it off. Food snobs are annoying as the devil, but anyone eating healthily—particularly in 2017—deserves two thumbs up, as far as I'm concerned. That's not "healthy nannying," that's good advice and common sense, These photos are amazing, as always. And yes, well said, JVK.

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    6. Being a former Californian, I certainly get what Greenfield is saying. It is boring to hear about it constantly--especially in a restaurant when these very special non-eaters are ordering and telling the waiter about all of their "sensitivities." I used to want to say, "Please stay home and coddle your big damn organic carrot." That being said, I am at an age where I need to try harder to keep my energy level up, so I have paid attention to how certain foods work vs. others. I have never been one for artificially sweetened things and other manufactured "Frankenfood," and I do love my full-fat Haagen-Dazs now and then. When I was a kid, my favorite after-school snack was a piece of toasted sourdough bread with butter and Knott's Berry Farm Boysenberry jam. That was back in the 1950s, and we played outside until it was time for dinner. I never saw an obese child or adult in my "wonder years." A soda (e.g. Coke) was a treat we went out for, and at Woolworth, that was one of those paper cones held in a metal base with some crushed ice--so maybe 3 oz. of actual soda at the most. We rarely ate out except for a special occasion. We didn't eat huge portions. We wanted to run around a lot outside. Back then I never heard any conversations about health, diet, etc. Sorry for the tangent, but all this is to say that in this century and at a certain age, I think there is a balance between being an anorexic foodie snob and a careless glutton. We have a huge health problem with so much obesity and all of its ramifications. I take personal responsibility for my choices in hopes of feeling as good as possible (at this age), still enjoying good food in proper amounts, and NOT being that dreadful better-than-you-are bore.

      Jacqueline

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    7. Patsy, what a great response: "Did I just happen to be caught in your judgement net?

      "Anorexic ideation" and "anorexic foodie" are intended insults from those (usually) without any formal training whatsoever, based upon a mere few words. Said anorexia experts will gleefully disparage and diagnose someone who somehow "restricts" (note the negative connotation for self-restraint) their intake of food. Of course there are true anorexics out there and the watering down of the diagnosis helps no one.

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    8. Jacqueline, you brought up many good points about the way things used to be, and fortunately, for those of us of a certain age, we have the beauty of seeing both the then and now of these cultural changes - if only we could resurrect the simplicity of that by-gone era and go outside and play again! However, in this present age where food has become an obsession for many and sensitivities abound, whether real or imagined, there is nothing more off-putting than taking your diet public. While there is nothing wrong with having a food discussion on this forum, from an etiquette standpoint, it is considered bad manners to bore your dinner mates with the details of your food restrictions or your latest trendy diet. Furthermore, it is an abomination to make wait staff and chefs jump through hoops in order to satisfy an often self-imposed eating style - just stay home or make the best choices you can from what is being offered, after all, it's just one meal and it's not going to kill you! Simple requests within a normal range are perfectly acceptable, but I've witnessed people make a monkey out of waiters and never think to leave an extra tip for their effort. Beyond this, focusing so much attention on your personal needs rather than exchanging quality interactive conversation with others over what is meant to be a pleasureable experience is just a breach of social etiquette. And one more thought, unless you truly have a food allergy, never place undue demands on a host or hostess to meet your dietary desires. If you are vegan, have the courtesy to bring a dish that you are able to eat. I apologize for the rant, but the etiquette instructor in me sometimes comes spilling out.

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    9. Jacqueline, to back up your point about obesity in the 1950s, it was indeed far less (I wrote a short book about it.)

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    10. @JVK: Yes, exactly on all that you said.

      Jacqueline

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    11. @Averyl: I'm not saying that we ate perfectly back in the day. It certainly wasn't all oats & groats--even out in California. We were definitely more active in general, and our activities were not planned and scheduled. We were just moving around more. Portions were smaller then, even at home. Old cookbooks would indicate "serves 6," whereas today, that would likely be "serves 4." I don't even remember anyone eating in their cars unless it was at a "drive-in" with carhops.

      Jacqueline

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    12. Jacqueline I understand. :) I lost weight and keep it off (and improved my "numbers") by "eating retro." I eat real butter, cheese and carbs in moderation.

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    13. I have discovered the same thing, Averyl, by eating more healthy fat, lots of fiber, moderate protein and carbs, and my "numbers" have gotten better too! I've studied the French diet and I have to give it to them, they aren't blown by the wind on every food fad that comes along. Generally, they eat quality food that has stood the test of time; small portions, greater variety and more fruits than we do in the U.S. They would never look at food as sinful, only pleasurable. (I also hear they also smoke cigarettes, ha!) Anyway, what is your book called? It sounds interesting.

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    14. Averyl and JVK: Yes, real food eaten with pleasure. That whole fat-free trend didn't work out so well in these here United States while the French kept eating their cheese, butter, baguettes, and chocolate in reasonable portions. Another thing about "retro eating" was that when we were eating, we were eating--at the table, no distractions, not in front of the television, not on the run, not in the car, and not constant snacking ("You'll ruin your dinner). Yes, an afternoon bit after school when dinner was two or three hours away. Water with meals and not sweet drinks. Even at the movies, it was a box of popcorn, and those boxes probably held two cups at the most. There were no tubs. This was not restrictive eating; it was just normal.

      Jacqueline

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    15. Right on Jacqueline! It's called discipline and self-restraint. Life was once more formal; it had rules and structure. It is now a free-for-all and anything goes society. I wrote an article on this topic but my gut instinct is that it wasn't received with enthusiasm, especially for today's young parents. Greenfield was on target when he said, "Moderation - something the old Puritans had a handle on."

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    16. JVK, thank you for asking. You’re surely familiar with the title “French Women Don’t Get Fat.” My book title is “American Women Didn’t Get Fat in the 1950s.” It was published in 2013 and was very polarizing with people either loving or hating it. Some believe it is a “fat shaming” book and era. I have a follow-up book in (slow moving) progress. I own a vast collection of diet, health and cook books dating back to the Victorian Era that I’m using as my references. I also digitized a 1950s PSA film still on the reel called “Cheers for Chubby.” It’s on YouTube if you’d like to have a look. I'd be interested in reading your article!

      Jacqueline, yes! It’s a mindset that includes moderation, being present in the moment and enjoying the experience of eating. Everything you describe is what I wrote about and practice.

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    17. JVK and Averyl: Yes and yes! I really don't think it's all that complicated. Structure and appropriateness seem to have evaporated in so many areas of life. Sometimes people think that structure means rigid, but it certainly doesn't have to be. I see so many lifestyles that look absolutely chaotic. I am grateful to have grown up they way I did.

      Jacqueline

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    18. Jacqueline - I am anything but rigid, yet structure plays a big role in my life. It's that delicate balance that makes everything seem effortless while still maintaining order. I, too, am grateful for the sensible foundation in which I grew up!

      Averyl - Thank you for sharing the title of your book; I hope to read it. "Cheers for Chubby" is a hoot and oh so true! Your interest in the 50s fascinates me. As for my article, it's called "Tradition Takes a Back Seat in the Casual Home." Unfortunately and unbelievably, the community magazine I write for isn't online and I have yet to add it to my newly updated website. If you want to contact me through my website, I will be happy to send it to you - www.definingmanners.com

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    19. @JVK: You are so very right about structure providing a balance. When a sense of seemingly effortless order is maintained, it prevents a lot of stress. Your articles sound very interesting, and I truly believe that if some of the "modern" families who lead very hectic lives would choose to embrace more order and tradition, they would likely be happier and healthier. I have so enjoyed this communication that began with the subject of snacks.

      Jacqueline

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  5. Generally my mid-afternoon snack is a handful of almonds and cup of tea.

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  6. A handful of nuts. They're filling and healthy. Some chopped vegetables, as shown above, also works. But, it's usually some kind of shelled nuts.

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  7. Since I've been on a low-carb diet for several months, my snacks are typically roasted almonds, spicy sunflower seeds, or a square of dark chocolate. That's my ideal afternoon snack. More typical, however, is a breve made with heavy cream to get me through all the after-school activities with an SUV full of children.

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  8. When on the go, it is unsalted dry roasted peanuts. However, this afternoon (I work from home) it's a pot of orange tea and a few fig newtons.

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  9. Almonds, string cheese or yogurt. Perfect snack: Cadbury Royal Dark. The entire bar. Ha!

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    1. I have Cadbury Royal Dark for dessert every night!

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    2. I want dessert at your house!

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  10. Frozen banana milk smoothie with either cocoa,frozen
    blueberries/strawberries or coffee for flavor. Every day.

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    1. I leave out the milk and whip up a sorbet almost every afternoon when I start to lag. Frozen bananas are a wonder.

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  11. About 8 months of the year, I reach for a frozen yogurt popsicle but, when it's cold, I love a cup of Earl Grey and a little bit of sweet something. If I'm craving savories, I'll go for a few whole wheat crackers or almonds and a few thin slices of parmesan cheese.

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  12. Hand-sliced, peanut oil cooked, home-made Idaho potato chips. Not the healthiest choice, but you've never had a chip until you tried 'em. A summer staple (but never around long enough) in our family.

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  13. For several years I participated in paid focus groups where we tried food products among others and discussed our likes and dislikes and how they related to our lifestyles. After a couple of hours with a dozen interesting and congenial people I would find myself at the same place I find myself after reading the comments on afternoon snacks. I'm 75 and in fairly good health and enjoy Ritz and peanut butter or maybe Goldfish with a caffeine free diet Dr Pepper or if it's to be a sweet snack then I favor Little Debbie oatmeal pies or maybe powdered sugar donut holes with my favorite sweet snack drink - water. Sometimes a pause with some freshly ground bean coffee is all I need. It's the same coffee I have all day but its special when I relax mind and body while drinking it.

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  14. lemon shortbread dipped in white chocolate. I don't think I have ever snacked on sugar snap peas!

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  15. Spicy tamari pumpkin seeds, almonds, cashews or walnuts, apple slices with almond butter, homemade yogurt and berries or my latest favorite - Flaxseed Wasa crisps with either hummus or goat cheese spread, and if I want to make lunch out of it, I add smoked salmon or trout.

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    1. Oh yes, for my mental health and occasional sweet tooth, I recently discovered Lilly 70% dark chocolate sea salt bars made with stevia instead of sugar so I never feel guilty!!

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  16. Palmetto Cheese on Fritos scoops or a hand full of grapes. Different snacks for different needs.

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  17. In a fantasy world where calories don't count, I would stop at Round Top Dairy in Damariscotta, Maine, and have an ice cream cone. Reality tends to be healthier: a slice of Ezekiel toast spread with cream cheese, sprinkled with cinnamon and a few walnuts, or a half cup of Siggi's yogurt or Icelandic Skyr with fresh berries. The older I get the more I steer away from fat-free, sugar-free and anything artificial.

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  18. In my fantasy world, I would have a hot Krispie Kreme glazed donut. But who gets to do that? :-(

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    1. from one Susan (aka "Sassy") to another:
      I completely concur! Perhaps, it's something in the name?!

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  19. Cobblescones made with maple syrup or honey and packed full of oatmeal, butter, hand-ground wheat flour, dried cranberries and slathered with blackberry jam! If they are to travel, I bake them extra. Excellent taste and healthful as well. The original recipe is from a historic recipe found in a book at Mystic Seaport purchased during our honeymoon 25 years ago. The recipe book also included a recipe for Joe Frogger cookies that are a family sailing staple. Along with apples, carrots, cheese, nuts, almond butter, homemade venison jerky and naturally sweetened homemade yogurt.

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    1. Dear Patsy:

      In no way was my post above "judging" you, quite the contrary; my point was it's a shame peer pressure is now so bizarre that one feels the need to "apologize" for wanting to eat something yummy! Whom among us, seriously, would prefer reaching for a handful of edamame over that cobblescone slathered with blackberry jam? ;-) Life is also to be ENJOYED. Those comfortable in their social group and in their own skin feel little need to advertise their "health" habits (today's PC substitute for Calvinist virtue) to vigorously separate themselves from the deplorable proles, for whom "obese" is the proxy code word. The simple, boring key is MODERATION, something the old Puritans had a pretty good handle on.

      Enjoy the weekend!

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  20. A large Snickers bar, washed down with a Diet Pepsi! LOL

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  21. Frozen red grapes or some good cheese and crackers along with a cup of Mariage Freres tea. I like Eros the best. Jane Keller

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  22. A hot wedge of fresh cornbread with buttermilk or fresh chocolate cake with coffee.

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  23. Tea and ginger biscuits!

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  24. Oolong tea and buttered toast.

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  25. One of my favorite obits contained a line about a survivors who was the son-in-law that taught at Ga Tech and had written a recently released book on quantum physics as it relates to watermelons or some such thing. Amazing how marketing can slip into a discussion on most any subject even snacks.

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  26. Blue Crab Bay Company Barnacles spicy snack mix with Chesapeake Bay seasoning.

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  27. Just a handful of unsalted potato chips at 3:00.

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