Monday, May 29, 2017

Memorial Day


"As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free."
- From the original lyrics, Battle Hymn of the Republic 
"As He died to make men holy, let us live to make men free."
- From the modified lyrics, Battle Hymn of the Republic

8 comments:

  1. On this solemn day on which we honor those who paid for our freedom in blood, let us reflect that our much-ballyhooed "rights" come with responsibilities.

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  2. "Much ballyhooed" rights? And why is "rights" in quotation marks? Is there anything you don't have a cynical take on, Greenfield?

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  3. Just think, Americans gave their lives so you two could interject politics into a solemn but stirring piece.

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  4. Anon 9:40 p.m., it's actually a two lines from the Battle Hymn of the Republic, not a "piece," and the only person who's mentioned politics is you. Happy Memorial Day.

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  5. In my part of the world when I was little, it was called Decoration Day. I don't recall it having any military service connection, at least not the way it mostly does now. Several in my family service, including my father, my son and myself but everybody came home in one piece. It was just a day to visit the cemetery and put flowers on graves.

    Incidentally, my father, my son and I all took our basic training at the same place. My father 23 years before me and my son 39 years after me. My son-in-law had to be different and joined the Air Force. All of us served overseas.

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    1. My understanding is that Decoration Day was never never intended to be just a day to decorate graves--it originated shortly after the Civil War as a day to decorate the graves of the fallen.

      Thank you for your service!

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    2. When I was little, there were lots of things that I wouldn't have understood. I saw the world as a boy still in grade school in the 1950s.

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  6. Every Memorial Day for the past 12 years I have conducted a 21-Minute Gun Salute among the three yacht clubs on my harbor. We use 10 GA signal cannons, firing the first round at 12 noon, with each successive round fired a minute apart. The 21st round is fired at 12:20, whereupon the U.S. Ensign is raised to full staff. This is an adaptation of the same solemn US Navy Minute Gun Salute that is conducted aboard Navy ships and land installations equipped with 40mm saluting batteries. We synchronize the shots by observing the time from handheld GPS units. It has been very well received by veterans groups in our area.

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