Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Pipes

Original Photographs from Archives
Almost all would agree that the smoking of pipes was a habit of its time, as it should be.  Nevertheless, many - the last generation to have experienced it naturally - have deep and resonating memories of the experiences, from the Alfred Dunhill shop in New York and the Owl Shop in New Haven, to the role pipes served in various outdoor and indoor pastimes.


Arthur Miller


19 comments:

  1. Those were the days.
    Enjoyed them while they lasted.
    Glad they're over.

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  2. My maternal grandfather passed away forty years ago this year, and I can still smell the aroma of his pipe, see him puffing it contentedly (the sunlight angling through the window and illuminating the curls of smoke hovering in the air), reading, oblivious to the world, occasionally resting his pipe in the stand-up smoker next to his chair. What I'd give to be there again.

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  3. Enjoyed this timely post...just over the weekend my adult children were sharing old photos. The one that cracked me up most was my youngest son, age 5, dressed up in his father's Valley Forge Military uniform with a pipe hanging from the side of his mouth. For better or worse, this little fellow wanted to be like his dad! These relics of bygone days bring back memories, but I'm happy to leave them there. The pipe collection has been stowed in the barrister bookcase, untouched, for years.

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  4. The white dot denotes Dunhill. They are now around $1000 each give or take. Although I miss the idea of my father and grandfather as gentlemen with their pipes, I'm glad the era of smoke-filled rooms are done.

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    1. My entry above here. So this post prompted me to ask my mother why my grandfather stopped smoking a pipe. Mouth cancer. Had no idea. That in turn made my father stop, but he had emphysema as a result of smoking. So much for the Madison Ave. glamorous appeal.

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  5. My father in law was a pipe smoker. He's been dead for many years now. I still can see him lighting up. Can't say I miss that aspect of him.

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  6. Pipe culture is alive and well in shops like LJ Peretti in Park Square in Boston and Leavitt & peirce in Havard Sq. in Cambridge. Most of the famous blenders like Dunhill Have now licensed their signature blends to companies outside of England in Germany and Denmark, and while many will argue that they are different, they are remarkably close. Gawith Hogarth is one if not the last english blender currently producing their tobacco blends in the UK. We have the McClelland tobacco company in Kansas City, MS who make terrific tobacco blends stateside. To say it was a habit of its time is kind of a funny statement because it was a rather long time and many folks still smoke pipes. I live in eastern long island and I have no problem getting a pound of my favorite blend shipped from Peretti's in boston straight to my door. I'd say that in the past twenty years it has certainly become more fashionable to smoke a cigar leisurely. However, it's much easier to fish, hunt, or do yard work with a pipe in your mouth as it does not require your hands! Smoking is bad habit - whether it's cigarettes, a cigar, or a pipe, but I do love the aroma of a nice blend on a crisp night.

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  7. This past time is currently hip and now...like the Lumber-metro -sexual-hipster dude...yes, really.

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  8. Well, I hope the hipsters don't get mouth cancer like my grandfather.

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  9. Several of my prep school teachers smoked pipes. One of the men often had saliva strung between the stem and his mouth when speaking. Distracting, if not disgusting.

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  10. Leavitt & Pierce on Mass Ave! That's where the Harvard crew boatings were posted in the window each day. (Now it's done by e-mail. Sad!) ;>

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  11. Correction! Levitt and PEIRCE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-OCWvekJR4

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  12. I cannot remember the last time I saw a man smoking a pipe.

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  13. When I was a child, our neighbor, Mr. Powers, smoked his pipe every night on his front porch after dinner. We would creep over and peek at him through a hedge. He would shake his pipe and shout at speeders - meaning those going over 30 mph. It was great pre-tech entertainment. I still remember the lovely scent of pipe smoke that wafted through the air. Despite his smoking, he lived to be 98. Have not thought about this in years. - Lexy

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  14. Used to smoke a pipe when I was single. When I was dating my wife, she made me give it up. Very wise woman. The pleasure of pipe smoking was not worth the risk of mouth and or stomach cancer.

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  15. When I was an 8th grader at Alice Deal in DC, I can remember a teacher smoking a pipe in the school building. The smoke would fill the halls. This was the early 1980s.

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  16. I used to smoke cigarettes, then moved to a pipe, and on to cigars. I believe I enjoyed pipe smoking the most because of a calming effect--you really couldn't do too many other things while smoking a pipe. The only people who seemed not to be offended by cigar smoking was other cigar smokers, and cigarette smoke pretty much bothers everyone. We still have a few nice tobacconists left in St. Louis and they still have that characteristic smell, but I don't often see a pipe smoker anywhere. Incidentally, I found my old tobacco pouch the other day and it still smelled of the tobacco I used to smoke. I cannot remember the name but it still smells pleasant after 25 years. However, as a person who quit smoking after 20+ years I often wonder how it holds any allure to the younger generations, particularly with all the information available regarding cancer, etc., but to do it to be a hipster? I'm sure those photos will look really ridiculous years from now...

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  17. My grandfather died in 1994, and I still have the rudimentary ashtray my aunt made for him in school, that he used exclusively for about 50 years. Plus several of his pipes, and his last package of rum-infused "Captain Black." I keep it in a hidden drawer in my desk, and once in awhile take it out for a whiff. Never fails to make me smile--and bring him back in spirit!

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  18. With a pipe you could smoke while fly fishing in the rain. You just turned it upside down in your mouth and the water ran right off.

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