Friday, February 10, 2017

New England Snow Photographs Over a Hundred Year Span

All Original Photographs from Archives
 “I don't lie about a winter temperature I've seen on the thermometer outside my bedroom window, when I report it at the office later in the morning. But if it is a very low reading, I don't announce it right away either. I wait for others to report the reading on their thermometers. Then, if the reports are higher than mine, I weigh my timing carefully, and at what I consider to be an appropriate moment, play my own reading....   
A brief but satisfying victory is mine if there follows nothing but some wows, no-kiddings, and is-that-rights. Often, however, someone will have waited even longer to play an even lower temperature. The victory is then his or hers.”   
- Judson Hale, Inside New England <http://amzn.to/20JMO4j>


















































































15 comments:

  1. “The most serious charge that can be brought against New England is not Puritanism but February.” - Joseph Wood Krutch

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  2. I spent the historic Nor'easter of 1994 in a house deep in the woods outside of Warwick, in western Massachusetts. The silence, except for the occasional screams of the wind blowing snow and ice against the clapboard in great thumps, was complete and almost holy. The world was so white that even the night darkness seemed to be lit with white. It was a thing of untrammelled beauty, if only because we were safe inside with a cord of firewood just outside the kitchen door. But unforgettable, and awe-inspiring. And when it was over and the sun came out, the snow was bright and general, and almost a preview of heaven.

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    1. Beautiful comment, Michael Rowe. I just love a good old-fashioned snowstorm. These pictures depict a lifestyle that seems to be reserved for the very hearty. I like to consider myself one of them, if that doesn't sound too pretentious.

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    2. Being hearty is never pretentious, just healthy!

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    3. Except that after 72 hours of dragging hundreds of pounds of hay bales and feed buckets through a foot of the stuff, you start to understand the meaning of "needing a little Bute to make 'em 'comfortable.'" ;-)

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    4. What a beautiful comment. What I wouldn't give to experience that, just once.

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  3. Wonderful comments above. There is nothing like a crisp, sunny day after a big snow storm. I went for a drive along the coast. So beautiful. New England at its winter best. You've captured it with this post.

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  4. Fabulous beautiful and varied collection of snow photos! Thank you! I have snow envy down here in Atlanta. But I have to admit that the photo of ice covering all those steep stone steps made my stomach clench. Yikes! Winter isn't over, so I'm looking forward to more later :-)

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  5. Thank you for the time and effort that went into this post! You are a jewel, appreciated. Between Nana Ice Cycle, The Skater and such-what a world to disappear into today, thank you!

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  6. Third time thru...I just got the car parked on the wrong side of the street, next to intersection, why the two pictures of it.

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  7. If I may Muffy, @5:31 it is the corner of Elm Street and Church Street in New Haven, Connecticut. Elm is a one way street with parking on both sides on that block.... Still the same and legal parking in 2017. 56' Oldsmobile is my guess.

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  8. People rave about New England in autumn, but I say there's nothing more idyllic than New England in winter. I smiled when I saw the ice hockey players on the pond. It took me back to junior high when a favorite English teacher would invite a number of us boys and girls to his house in winter to play hockey on his pond. I can still savor the smell and taste of those roasted hotdogs over the fire, and the warmth I felt from the hot chocolate he served. It was pure magic!

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  9. Seems like 100 years is so long ago, until I realize that my Dad is 87.

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