Tuesday, February 7, 2017

10 Favorite Moments of Midsomer Murders - Season 6, Episode 1: A Talent for Life

Screenshots taken from Netflix of Midsomer Murders - Season 6, Episode 1: A Talent for Life. For copyright information, see: <http://www.all3media.com/Content/Brand-Midsomer.html>
Below are just some of the enjoyable moments in Season 6, Episode 1: A Talent for Life.  No spoilers are contained.  Of course, the episode is worth watching simply to appreciate the two real stars in this episode - The " Jaguar-owning pensioner" (and former Bond girl Ms. Galore) Honor Blackman and her red 1952 Jaguar XK120 roadster.

1 .The complexity around Isobel Hewitt - played perfectly by Honor Blackman - is captured in a single laugh near the beginning of the episode.



2. Great fly fishing garb, including a shirting fabric that looks remarkably similar, if not identical, to Mercer's Lambtontm 80% Cotton, 20% Wool Dorset Greens on Cream Plaid <http://www.mercerandsons.com/swatches_and_pricing-larger-checks-and-plaids.htm>


3. The Architecture


4. So many Midsommer Murders episodes are distinguished by their insults.  In this case, as recounted by one of the characters: "She told me I fished more down stream than up."   (1:36.08)


A Talent for Life (And a Great Wardrobe) 

5. The joy captured in the answer to Quentin's question "What are we celebrating?" in the line "Getting the ghastly Rebecca off my back." is not only infectious, but serves to introduce the beautiful car.


6. The entire airfield sequence is lovely, including the police interview, where a defense Isobel gave of  hitting another was simply, and obviously, "Well, you met her..."


7. Leo delivers one of the most unfortunately timed lines.  "After that business about your wife and Duncan Goff."


8.  Peter Cellier's Peregrinne Slade is a delight.  Is he insulting the host and hostess, or saving the day, or both when he says "Yes, yes I can see,"? Hasting's deadpan is the perfect compliment. (Some may remember Peter Cellier as "The Major" from Keeping Up Appearances.)


9. "Oh you're the poodle."


10. Slade's speech on the balcony is similarly pitch perfect, including the insults that sound like complements, and the compliments that sound like insults. "Honourable members, and not such honorurable members.... I remember telling her how moving out into the country, amongst the inbreds and hayseeds, how she'd lose touch with her city mates..."

Midsomer Murders - Season 6, Episode 1: A Talent for Life is available on Netflix (including in the US), Acorn TV <https://acorn.tv/midsomermurders>, and on DVD <http://amzn.to/2ljCAVp>.

16 comments:

  1. Great episode! Some may also remember the fly fisherman as Roger Fenn from Doc Martin.

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  2. I love this program. Each time I see an episode, I get the same surge of joy I feel when I see friends. The British know how to develop endearing characters!

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  3. Terrific show. Even the later episodes with DCI John Barnaby are great.

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  4. Midsomer Murders is my "go to" show when I need cheering up. (Murder cheers me up? No! The British village scenery and quirky characters!) It's like my comfort food. I'm so happy it's on Netflix and so happy to see that others on this side of The Pond enjoy it, too. I'm going to do one of the Midsomer Murders tours of filming locations next time I'm in the UK. :-) PS I like the later episodes just as much, too.

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  5. Love this program. Every episode is a great. A little trip to a memorable place.

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  6. It is a shame Netflix no longer has Upstairs, Downstairs, All Creatures Great and Small, Inspector Morse, and other wonderful British programs available. We should probably all enjoy Midsomer Murders now because Netflix is likely to discontinue it as well. GLH

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    1. Try Acorn T.V. for many of the British greats!

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    2. I agree. AcornTV is excellent for Brit TV.

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  7. Love these. Borrow them from the library as well as other British television. We just finished watching the divine Anthony Andrews in "The Syndicate." Which overall begs the question as to why is British TV so much better than ours?

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  8. I have been re-watching all of the episodes of Lewis, to which I am addicted, and which can make Midsomer Murders seem a bit silly in comparison. But I always loved Midsomer as pure escapism and used to watch it each week on television together with my mother-in-law, until I bought her the entire series on DVD. Your post inspires me to go back and watch a few, including this one. (Other faves include Dead in the Water, Electric Vendetta, Ring Out Your Dead, Maid in Splendour, Sauce for the Goose, Birds of Prey, and The Made to Measure Murders)

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  9. Way too late to the Honor Blackman appreciation team, wasn't she radiant indeed! But not at all late to the understated Barnaby:Troy rapport where a simple turn of the head, a tilt of the lip, befuddled browline, those two were low key great together, so much so that I hated to see Troy leave the show. [Edited]

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  10. What a great idea. I was looking for something to watch this evening.

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  11. Addendum to #6, "Why yes, I slapped her, well yes..." and then continues that the slap actually saved the woman from dying of a coronary.

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  12. We have been enjoying a documentary series on village life: "Penelope Keith's Hidden Villages".

    It originally is from Channel 4 (UK). Locally, it is broadcast over the air on WETA-UK. DVDs for sale do not work in a US DVD player, else we woukd buy the DVDs.

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  13. This shows is shown on PBS America. I ve been watching for years. It took me awhile to understand the plots. The reasons for the murders always date back to some wrong doings decades before. I've always found that fascinating. These villages only have 10 people living in them but average at least three murders per episode. Absolutely hilarious except for the victims. A great show. Any episode is alright with me.

    the

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