Wednesday, January 25, 2017

This Old Hen


This free-range Barred Rock has been eluding predators (and often humans) for nine years.
The Barred Rock is one of the all time popular favorites in this country. Developed in New England in the early 1800's by crossing Dominiques and Black Javas, it has spread to every part of the U.S. and is an ideal American chicken. Prolific layers of brown eggs, the hens are not discouraged by cold weather... These chickens are often called Plymouth Rocks, but this title correctly belongs to the entire breed, not just the Barred variety. 
- Murray McMurray Hatchery (from where she came) <https://www.mcmurrayhatchery.com/barred_rocks.html>


Boots Sent by Dubarry
Sweater Sent by Aran Sweater Market

7 comments:

  1. See what happens when you skip bail? As seen here, Henny Penny is now fully aware of there is no escape from the Long Arm of the Law...

    May I please ask how was she ever caught?

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  2. Any idea how many years she laid eggs?

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    1. She has been a good layer right up to last October, when she took her annual molt break. Expecting her first egg of the season any day now, though she has yet to squat.

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  3. What a lovely hen! I do so enjoy the gentle clucking of contented hens and the sometimes raucous cackle that announces the laying of an egg. Although I still have not acquired a new flock, I do have the pleasure of enjoying watching and listening to my neighbor's small flock, and occasionally benefit from a surplus of their eggs.

    May I ask where the gloves are from? I lost mine and am looking for replacements.

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  4. We got our first Barred Rock chicks from this same hatchery last spring. They were mixed in with other brown egg layers, but this breed is by far the most beautiful. All 15 chicks were supposed to be hens, but around month 3, we noticed one was making a strange noise throughout the day. It turns out, he was/is a rooster and is the best looking one of the flock. We also have one old black hen who was a runaway from an Amish farm. She is a survivor and still lays an egg for us every now and then. There's nothing like homegrown eggs from pasture-raised hens.

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  5. It has its own form of camouflage!

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  6. That's one good lookin' chook.

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