Thursday, January 19, 2017

Organic Eggs and the Honor System


Examples of the honor system in practice never fail to buttress a faith in people in general.


14 comments:

  1. A testament to the inherent goodness of people.

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  2. Goodness is here but it gets lost in the modern noise.

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  3. Love this. Heart-warming, even. We've been having record breaking snow in Idaho and people have been helping people daily. One sees strangers helping push cars, clearing driveways, etc. insert sigh of contentment.

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  4. We see this a lot in Gloucestershire and I love it. Always great for picking up eggs, manure, honey and cooking apples. My neighbour and I share "gluts" from our vegetable patches over the hedgerow and walking home from church via the allotment is always a sure-thing for coming home with some form of produce. I wouldn't change it for the world. Though I do wish this type of sharing would extend into suburban and city areas more. This is the stuff "happy" is made of.

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  5. Your post reminds me of the time my husband and I were riding our bikes on a "rails to trails" path in Lewisburg in the heart of Pennsylvania farm land. At the one rest stop there was a cooler of homemade root beer for the thirsty bikers and walkers. Although our water was satisfying, I recall the root beer was free for the taking. Nonetheless, it was charming and refreshing to think that someone was looking out for the welfare of the trail users, a rarity in this day and age. Also, having grown up in the Pennsylvania "Dutch" region, the honor system is used quite often along the country roads. I especially love the jars of zinnias for sale in late summer.

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  6. If you only judged the world by your neighbors and from what you can see from your front door, your opinion of the world might be a little better. But notice I said the front door and not the back door.

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  7. Wonderful thank you for a great way to start the day.

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  8. I see examples like these at farmstands in rural Sussex County, NJ. Perhaps not with organic eggs, but with fruits, vegetables and wow, milk in real bottles! I've also seen pies and cakes sold this way.

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  9. Simply wonderful. Now, give it a shot in The Bronx.

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    1. I grew up in NYC and was shocked when I first saw this in practice where I now live in Maine. I couldn't believe that people would leave a can of money on the roadside, let alone their produce or products. It was a healing moment for me and I still get a kick out of it.

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  10. I encountered the honor system for the first time when my family relocated to Vermont a few years ago. I still find it fascinating. I told one of the farmers that if he tried this where I grew up, he would not only be missing the meat, eggs, and plastic bag full of money, but the freezer as well. The misnomer is that no one abuses the system. There are 'beef thieves', but fortunately they are few enough of these to keep the practice going. I can only speak for central Vermont, but you generally won't find these honor stores on main highways. Instead, they are on backroads used mainly by locals.

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  11. We have the honor system at all of the local farms. However, I always need to remind myself to bring enough cash. They don't take debit cards.

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  12. Only WASPs with civic-mindedness get this. This won't work in America anymore.

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  13. I see this around the NH Seacoast where I live. Always makes me smile.

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