Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Quoddy: Boat Shoes and Dawson Mocs

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When one looks at the Quoddy Dawson Mocs one is struck by two things:  how heavy they are and how extraordinary beautifully and toughly constructed they seem.  Just feeling the weight alone might make one think that it would take a month or two to break in.



In fact, it takes less than five minutes.  Almost immediately the seemingly unbendable leather becomes pliant.

They are true to size.
They have a leather sole....


...and some incredible hand stitching.


 


 


 These shoes are made in Maine and it shows.


The Quoddy Men's Boat Shoe is a classic model with three eyelets.  But that is where the comparisons to ordinary boat shoes end.

So many shoes currently available, either because of the mass production techniques, cheap materials, or unskilled workers, stop fighting the feet they sheathe only when they are near death.  But these hearty boat shoes seemingly live to serve.




The only challenge of breaking in these shoes is to slightly dull their lustrous glow.  

These have completely replaced the Sperrys.

Maine-made Quoddy shoes are exported and sold all over the world.  They are a perfect ambassador of New England. 





24 comments:

Michael Rowe said...

Gorgeous shoes! Seriously, it's time to replace my crippling, non-arch-supporting Bean blucher moccasins--bought this summer and already past their shelf-date--with some new, well-constructed Maine-made shoes. These Quoddy mocs are beautiful. If Bean wants to pander to God know who their new customers are, and ditch those of us who've been loyal for 30 years or more, then I'm up for supporting the news classic clothing and footwear leaders.

T said...

I bought a pair of their Bluchers 3 years ago and a pair of their Boat Shoes a year after that, and they're both holding up wonderfully after regular heavy wear—the lined Boat Shoes a bit better than the unlined Bluchers. They are seemingly bomb-proof.

Speaking of proof, their Organic waterproofer smells like distilled awesomeness in a waxy puck-form...so much so that the terriers took to trying to open the can to eat the stuff. I'd recommend keeping it away from the dogs.

DT Chase said...

Muffy and others, I highly recommend the shoes made by Rancourt, also in Maine (I am not affiliated with the company whatsoever-- other than ownership of three pairs of their shoes!)

Cubanchem said...

Welcome to the club. Wonderful, aren't they? Enjoy them.

Anonymous said...

I agree with "replacing the Sperrys". I have a pair of Sperry's I bought close to 20 years ago, and they have finally given up the ghost. I went to replace them with a new pair and was disturbed at the light weight and change in hardware. I know I won't get even 10 years out of this new pair of cheaply built Sperrys...I am seriously looking at the Quoddys now. Thanks Muffy!

Anonymous said...

I think there is room for both Quoddy and Rancourt. The more companies that are making shoes in Maine the better. As an FYI, I don't think Muffy could shop at Rancourt. They don't make shoes for women.

j.mosby said...

Muffy,

You're going to get a lot of wear out of those Quoddy Bad boys! :-)

RR said...

I bought my first pair of Quoddy boat shoes at the beginning of this season, and love them. I suspect they will be in use for a very long time.

Anonymous said...

The one thing that the Sperry Topsider has that other deck shoes don't have is their patented razor-cut siped sole. If you are sailing and walking on decks that are awash, you want as good a grip to the deck as you can get. That said, even Sperry has modified their original razor cut sole in recent years and, in my opinion, have made it less effective on a wet deck.

Anonymous said...

Hey Muffy, have you tried their Bluchers yet? If so, how do they compare to L.L. Bean? I just ordered a pair from L. L. Bean but now I'm nervous that they will be uncomfortable. Is it even worth bothering with shoes from Bean now?

Anonymous said...

My Quoddy shoes are the most comfortable pair of shoes I own.

Anonymous said...

Great shoes! I so agree with your last sentence. Expensive, USA- and well-made goods with top quality materials are like nothing else. To buy anything else would be to downgrade. I love things that will last for 20 years because each time I wear or use them, they evoke great memories from the years past. They become like an old, familiar friend.

Patsy said...

My father's Quoddy mocs (what he calls his Quoddy boat shoes) have to be at least 30 years old. Maybe more.....

Amory said...

Aren't you concerned, Muffy, about the leather soles eventually wearing through? They look pretty worn already in one of the photos.

Cubanchem said...

@ Pete, feel free to email me for details. Cubanchem@gmail.com

BlueTrain said...

There are other American producers of similiar products, some nearly as expensive, some much less so, but from other places. So I guess in Maine, they'd be considered imports. Russell Moccasins are probably best known and are as dear as Quoddy mocs. There's also Minnetonka Moccasins, which are really more representative of ordinary American-made products of the pre-China era. Their styling is decidedly dated but you can find them where ever cedar salt and pepper shakers are sold.

By the way, I know that Quoddy has their own leather dressing for sale but I've been using Obernauf's oils on my own boat shoes when they begin to look a little dried out and scuffed. One light application is usually good for a year unless you are wearing them everyday.

Cranky Yankee said...

Along with Quoddy and Rancourt, I would add Eastland's 'Made in Maine' Falmouth and Yarmouth camp mocs.

Bitsy said...

@Cranky Yankee -- I have a pair of the Eastland Falmouths (Maine-made) that I've worn since college. They have held up all these years with only a recent re-stitching at the toe by my local cobbler. When he returned them to me, all polished up, they looked like new!

Anonymous said...

Muffy,

Do you care for the cross (x) stiching at the front of some quoddy, or do you only like the traditional stitching

Anonymous said...

May I ask a dumb question and make a suggestion?When you waterproof your Quoddy Dawson Mocs do you treat the sole?
I just reread your October 4, 2010 posting; I think it was great. You might suggest that current readers might enjoy reviewing it.
THANKS

John Haley said...

I'm trying to decided between the Dawson Moc and the Boat Moc. Anyone had experience with both? I'm interested in both comfort and ease of on/off.

Ted Cohen... said...

When it comes to boat mox, I am a huge fans of the Timberland Classic for one important reason:

They have no exposed stitching in the bottom of the sole.

My only complaint is that the brown TC comes only with a brown sole, not a white one.

I once had Quoddy mox with white soles and no sole stitching - in the early 1990s - but they no longer are made that way.

Anonymous said...

Dear Ms. Aldrich,
Per your recommendation, I purchased a pair of women's Quoddy Dawson mocs about two months ago. After anxiously awaiting their arrival, I finally received them about a week ago and I am in love!! I have not stopped wearing my mocs since I took them out of the box. They are well made and so comfortable with and without socks. I cannot thank you enough for your recommendation!
Sincerely,
Lindsey

Kev F said...

Hello, I am going to be visiting the States in the next week or two and want to acquire a pair of (probably) Quoddy's. I will be very happy with a pair of the boat shoes but I'm wondering how a pair of the Grizzly or Dawson mocs would stand up to our somewhat damper climate in the UK?